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Silicon Valley

We rounded up a list of talented, passionate, and hardworking tech entrepreneurs who are inspiring business innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Here is a short intro on four AfroLatinX who are making waves in the industry and are ones sure to watch! The Founder Providing Capital to Underrepresented Entrepreneurs A first-generation Afro-LatinX immigrant is undoubtedly making a name for himself in the startup world, using his talents to create a space for more people like him in tech. Luis Martinez is the founder of We Tha Plug, an incubator designed to help

Techish is back with a brand new episode! Abadesi and Michael discuss Instagram’s new feature will let online shops identify as Black-owned to better attract users wanting to show support. (28:00) They also break down: Bezos steps down and Amazon strives to be Earth’s best employer (0:20) Is it the end of an era for innovation for Big Tech companies?  (5:00) Sha’Carri Richardson’s ban from the Tokoyo Olympics, cannabis, and the politics of sport (8:55) The pros and cons of Robinhood going public (16:48) The online scam taking money from your bank transfers (23:40)

Get your ticket for Inbound 2021! Speakers include Oprah Winfrey, Tristan Walker and more! Register for your ticket here:   (Discount Code: POCIT) When Andréa Hudson had the opportunity to speak at a HubSpot panel for her work on branding and events marketing, it marked a pivotal point in her career. At that moment, she felt her work be recognized for its excellence and introduced to a wider audience. Today, Andréa works for the very same company that gave her that speaking opportunity. In this interview, Andréa discusses her work

From Memes, gifs, dances that go viral, and tweets—Black innovation and creativity have a significant impact on pop culture and mainstream trends. It’s Black creativity that sets cultural trends yet our innovation is constantly exploited. Earlier this month, Black Tiktokers went on strike refusing to make new dance content as their dances were ripped off and copied without recognition or compensation for their creativity.  Can NFTs be the tech that enables the Black community to receive appropriate financial compensation for the work they create? This article will showcase how some Black

Flatiron Health is hiring! Changing careers is never easy. When Richard Chounoune left a six-figure income to pursue a career in tech as a software engineer, he initially had a hard time adjusting to his new industry.  Today, Richard works at Flatiron Health, a healthtech company, as a recently promoted software engineer. Here he shares his experiences as a young immigrant from Haiti who felt stuck at a dead-end job and mustered the courage to pursue a passion for programming. From Selling Cars to Software Development Richard arrived in the

Techish is back with a brand new episode! Abadesi and Michael discuss an interesting development in the NFT space. Jay Z is suing Damon Dash over his attempted sale of ‘Reasonable Doubt’ as an NFT. Are we looking at NFT wars being a thing in the future? (19:35) They also break down: T-Pain talks about mental health, autotune, and Usher comments (0:11) Lina Khan, the new chair of FTC, reviews Amazon proposed deal to buy MGM (5:18) The new wave of consumer investing and meme stocks (12:40) Airbnb’s ‘Smart Pricing’ algorithm fail and a convo

What’s happening? Black content creators are tired. Tired of having their content on Instagram, Youtube, and Tiktok generate millions for the platforms—yet receiving little to no recognition, attribution, and of course, adequate financial compensation. So while white TikTokers receive national attention and praise for dance trends, the Black creators of these viral dances are ignored. The community often takes to Twitter to call out the many instances where original creators of viral dances, many of whom are Black, receive no credit. This is not a new problem Jimmy Fallon invited white TikToker,

You’ve likely noticed by now that the world has finally decided to amplify a long, on-going conversation about racism — at least for the moment. In the US, underpinning the headlines about policing and excessive use of force on Black and Brown bodies is the conversation about how systemic power disparities affect the Black community. As a Black, gay man from the South, I live this conversation. As a Black designer, I see my lived experience reflected in the perpetuation and preservation of white supremacy across the design field, both

It’s New Year’s Eve 2020, and I’m sure we are all thinking the same thing: “Thank you; next”. Seriously, what a year; but, onwards and upwards. On a personal note, 2020 has been a uniquely challenging, yet incredibly meaningful year for my career — launching Google’s first Accelerator programs for both women founders and Black founders. Running a program for Black entrepreneurs as a member of the Black community myself, I was more in a rhythm than I’ve ever felt professionally. It was comfortable, natural, and authentic to be able to support black entrepreneurship — not to

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