Posts in Tag

Mental Health

J Balvin, also known as the Prince of Reggaeton, has made a wholesome move to create an open discussion around mental health struggles by launching OYE, a bilingual wellness app.  The app, currently available for download on the app store, was built by Latin creators in Spanish and English. It provides users with emotional check-ins and goal-setting exercises and promotes the idea of achieving a balance between emotional wellness, physical health, and interpersonal relationships.  “After the pandemic, global youth – really everyone – is extremely burnt-out. Anxiety, depression, and feelings of being

Black women are 84% more likely to be abused on social media than white women, according to a 2018 Amnesty International study. By 2020, further research by Glitch, a UK charity committed to ending the abuse of women and marginalized people online, found that online abuse against women disproportionately impacts Black women, non-binary people, and women from minoritized communities, all of whom were more likely to feel like their complaints to social media companies were not adequately addressed. Black women in the public eye bear the brunt of online trolling. Seyi Akiwowo, the

According to Zion Market Research, the digital mental health market was valued at $1.4 billion (£1.1billion) in 2017 and is projected to reach $4.6 billion in 2026. Still, it has often been claimed that many of these apps do not cater to the specific challenges that Black, Indigenous, and people of color face. That’s why we’ve dug a bit deeper to find the apps that put inclusion and diversity at the forefront of their mission and have a mission to ensure everyone gets support. Therapy for Black Girls  Therapy for

LL Cool J and Michelle Williams have teamed up with tech company Salesforces.org for the Rock the Bells festival, which will take place on August 6, 2022. Based in Queens, New York, the festival will feature live performances from music veterans Lil Kim, Rick Ross, Jadakiss, and more. The program will not only champion legendary voices within hip-hop, but it will also help to raise awareness of the mental health issues and stigmas that continue to plague the music industry.  Salesforce.org first announced the initiative during their panel discussion earlier this year. They plan

Founder and CEO of mental health tech startup MindRight Health, Ashley Edwards, has raised $1.78 million in seed funding. The funding round led by investment platform Lifeforce Capital included existing investors Acumen America and Impact America Fund. New investors included Hopelab Ventures, Gaingels and Impact Assets, and Pivotal Ventures.  Edwards previously raised $1 million for MindRight Health in 2020. In doing so, became one of only 35 Black women in the US, and was reportedly the first Black woman in New Jersey, to achieve this level of VC funding. This

Williams has teamed up with online mental health platform BetterHelp and the Women’s Tennis Association to offer the unique gift of more than $2 million in free therapy sessions, The New York Post reports. Before matching you with a therapist, the online platform asks you a series of questions including if you would like to be linked with a religious therapist, your reasons for needing therapy, and what it is you’re looking for in a therapist. For example – someone that teaches new skills, challenges beliefs, assigns homework, or proactively

Platforms created by Black founders for communities of color continue to blossom. They are providing culturally competent care — acknowledging a patient’s heritage, beliefs, and values during treatment – in ways that other providers aren’t. Racial discrimination in healthcare disadvantages Black and other minority ethnic groups with unequal access to quality healthcare resources. Inspired by their own experiences, these Black entrepreneurs are launching startups that aim to close the cultural gap in health care with technology, create profitable businesses and tackle racism. R.grid Dr. Amber Michelle Hill is considered a force in the

Why Black Workers Are facing a return to office anxiety Ninety-seven percent of Black knowledge workers are not ready to return to offices. As a result, the home has become a safe space for Black workers in the last year, a refuge from racism, crude jokes, and office politics. Working from home has reduced the discrimination and microaggressions [indirect, subtle, or unintentional discrimination against members of a marginalized group] many Black people say they feel in the workplace, the survey also said. In addition, the need for code-switching is significantly reduced.