All posts by

Camille Eddy

Welcome to intern life! Whether you are experiencing your first internship, your second or third the encouragement is the same, stay on your toes, expect good things, be flexible and learn as much as you can. The formula is completely different from team to team WITHIN the company. You are going to have to learn that for yourself. If this is your first time at a new company I am sure you are excited this summer. But heads up, almost no one knows how to host an intern exactly right.

How do we find ourselves in a world where there are so many firsts to be had for women of color? There are so few doctors, engineers, filmmakers that reach the level of success and recognition that even some of our other sisters seem to receive. On my level, there are VERY few, in fact, let’s say there ten sisters of color on college campuses leading a vocal and influential charge. Not because they don’t have a voice but because they are overlooked when someone asks, who should lead the

First, I want to give credit to this idea to Jeneba who produced Yes We Tech: 161 Black Women in Tech to Follow on Twitter and 185 Women of Color in Tech to Follow on Twitter. My list is not as organized or detailed but has a different circle of users with a little overlap with these previous lists. I hope you can use all three lists to share this empowering narrative of the existence of women of color! Don’t be fooled by your environment, the movies you watch or the news stories you read,

It used to be a tall order to find a representative look for your powerpoint presentation that featured communities of color. Little to no stock photos existed that you could download or purchase that fit the theme. But that is not the case anymore! Here are four websites that will provide you a free collection of photos you can use with either attribution or email subscription. It is time to update your blogs, PowerPoints, branding material and all other forms of media representation you are creating! While everyone can’t pay

When tackling culture bias in Artificial Intelligence (AI), it is important to understand how much we use AI in our everyday lives. There are quite a few applications, and while they all have different names, a few of them are becoming more familiar to the general public. There are fields such as machine learning, face recognition, computer vision, virtual and augmented reality. You can also find artificial intelligence in traffic lights, GPS navigation, MRIs, air traffic controller software, speech recognition, and robotics. The point is, unlike the 90s, when AI

I recently took the opportunity to head down to NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California to see the arrival of Juno from behind the scenes. I was there as a social media ambassador with a group of other thought leaders to share in NASA’s next big moment of space exploration. While I was there, I met people I would not otherwise meet; the scientists who had an active part in designing the instruments on Juno, the project managers who drove the mission forward and even the Assistant Director for

picture courtesy of #WOCinTechChat Written by Camille Eddy   In my role as a machine learning intern, I go to work every day and start my job. I turn on my computer and start looking at my next tasks. But what was quickly unavoidable is the realization that the field of Machine Learning is not very diverse. In this article, I hope to outline why as a black woman, helping to make the next intelligent robot is a massive deal. And why we need to bring more underrepresented groups into