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Founders

Techish is back with a brand new episode! Abadesi and Michael discuss Black engineer, Katrina Parrot suing Apple for her creation of diverse emojis that they turned down. Can creators protect their ideas from being stolen or imitated? (0:25) They also break down: Is Clubhouse doomed to fail or be a great success? (7:07) Kanye vs Jay Z co-founder debate: who would you pick? (15:55) Gumroad crowdfunds equity and turns customers into investors (25:12) This Episode Is Sponsored By Notion Get your Notion account here. Notion is hiring! Check out their open positions  Extras: Techish on Patreon:Advertise

The Cannabis industry is booming but rife with inequities and discrimination. American marijuana businesses are projected to have between $106 billion and $130 billion by 2024 on the US economy. Often referred to as the ‘Green Rush’, hundreds of lucrative weed businesses have popped up all over the US where weed is now legal. The problem? These businesses are predominately white-owned. A 10+ billion dollar industry, and we own less than 1% of it. The big cannabis players, most of them white-owned and backed by lucrative venture capital, don’t face

The price of Bitcoin is surging. A new all time high for BTC reaching above $50K this month has everyone talking, bitcoin, crypto and investing. Major institutional investors, celebrity endorsements and payments firms like Mastercard and PayPal are investing in the cryptocurrency. Since the creation of Bitcoin 11 years ago, a growing number of people are turning to a new monetary system, one that is not controlled by any single authority. Cryptocurrency is a decentralized system run by a network of computers. In what some call a financial revolution, the rise in popularity of

Nigeria often dubbed, ‘Africa’s Silicon Valley’ is making a name for itself. Meet the talented Nigerians on the continent and the diaspora leading tech companies, building multi-million [and even billion] dollar business, investing in their community, and taking their talents globally. Tope Awotona | Founder, Calendly Awotona spent his early years as the second youngest in seven in a lower class neighborhood of Lagos, Nigeria. Yet, Awotona is the mastermind and founder behind a rarity – a Black-owned unicorn, the scheduling powerhouse, ‘Calendly.’ In an interview with Fortune, Tope talks

Kicking off Black History Month in the US Backstage Capital has announced they’re opening their fund to allow regular people to invest alongside Backstage Capital. Through the crowdsourcing platform, Republic, individuals will have easier access to become venture capitalists. Opening the doors of opportunity for regular people to invest like a VC. It’s already raised $1M from over 2000 investors, with amounts as a little as $100. Leading the way with a new approach to venture capital investing, accredited and non-accredited investors can invest alongside Backstage giving talented underrepresented founders access to capital.

The term unicorn in the tech space is synonymous with hugely successful tech companies (think Uber, Airbnb, Stripe, Pinterest, & DropBox). Its a term given to a private company with a $1 billion valuation. Although still very much a rarity, the number of unicorn startups is higher than ever. According to recent stats, there are 506 tech unicorns globally. So how does a company founded by a POC reach unicorn status? There is no definitive recipe for success. When less than 1% of venture capital is invested in Black businesses each year,

Damilola Olokesusi is the Co-founder and CEO of Shuttlers, a tech transport startup. In 2015, Olokesusi and her friends — Damilola Quadry and Busola Majekodunmi — were frustrated by the stress of commuting in Lagos, Nigeria. And following some nasty experiences, they decided to start Shuttlers. “One of my sisters got into a one-chance bus (a commercial bus used for robbing passengers), and it was a traumatic experience for me. She was taken to another destination where they were abducted and robbed. Having had our different bus experiences, we realised it was a collective pain point for us.

Techish is back with a brand new episode! Abadesi and Michael discuss the ProjectDiane report, revealing that 93 Black women have secured more than $1 million in venture capital [triple the number from 2018] (9:20). They also break down: Dr. Timnit Gebru ‘firing’ from Google (0:15) Can newly acquired Slack compete with Microsoft? (13:10) Are we cancelling Black celebs too quickly? (17:38) Headspace vs Calm – the battle between the meditation apps (22:19) The power of Netflix (29:37) Sponsors: Gruntwork is hiring a Senior Sales Engineer! Apply here Olark is hiring a Product Manager!

With Black founders receiving less than 1% of venture capital funding, many are forced to make-do without outside investment. However, for an ever-growing few, the intentional path without venture capital is looking increasingly attractive.  Letting go of Silicon Valley-style advice and finding your own path Courtland is the founder and driving force behind Indie hackers a community of bootstrapped entrepreneurs and makers. Courtland learned hard lessons from entrepreneurship Silicon Valley-style. The primary being: ‘go big and raise a lot of money’. During a stint at Y Combinator, he went to work on

Last week, Stripe announced it had purchased the Nigerian startup, Paystack for an estimated 200 million dollars. Founded in 2015 by Shola Akinlade and Ezra Olubi, Paystack is a platform designed to deliver a safe, convenient, and modern payment experience for customers and merchants in Africa. Background The idea for Paystack was born when Akinlade built a simple way of integrating a card transaction into a website. It was the simplicity of how it worked that propelled him and Olubi to think about developing it into a platform for others.

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