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HBCU

Soft drink company, Mountain Dew (MTN Dew), has expanded its commitment to Black entrepreneurship by creating a new Esports tournament that will see students compete for a $500,000 prize.  Following MTN Dew’s ‘Real Change Opportunity Fund’ initiative in 2020, the soft drink company has joined forces with HBCU Esports League to reinforce their commitment to supporting the next generation of Black entrepreneurs.  The tournament, launched last month, will run until October 28 and will be available for any gamers enrolled at an HBCU to register and join.  Black representation in gaming The

IBM has announced the launch of Cybersecurity Leadership Centers across six HBCUs.  The move aims to give students and faculty access to IBM training, software, and certifications at no extra cost.  Underrepresented students and professors can receive help with coursework, lectures, immersive training experiences, and knowledgeable skills they can always take with them as they grow.  According to IBM, the program will be available at 20 HBCUs across 11 states to help co-create Cybersecurity Leadership Centers and create talent opportunities for employers and students combined.  “Collaborations between academia and the private

Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) is the first HBCU to embark on new research programs in partnership with NASA.  WSSU’s Astrobotany Lab has signed a four-year agreement with NASA to research food development with a team of aspiring scientists.  The lab which is filled with all the materials needed to grow plants, fruits, and vegetables, uses synthetic dirt to figure out how to grow food in Mars.  The program is led by Professor Dr. Rafael Loueiro leads and aims to allow students to see the fascinating world of plants as well as the study

Billionaire philanthropist Robert F. Smith recently announced the launch of the Student Freedom Initiative, a program designed to provide paid internships to HBCU students.   Robert F. Smith will launch the Student Freedom Initiative’s HELPS Program in partnership with financial regulation company Prudential Finance. The partnership will address Black students’ disproportionate financial loan burden, which often hinders their career progression. The program aims to provide science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) HBCU students with $1.8 million in microgrants, which will act as a contingent fund alongside their traditional college loans.  Robert F. Smith, famously known

Non-profit tech platform, CodeHouse, has received a $1 million grant from Google.org to commence its second year of the CodeHouse Scholars Initiative (CHSI).  The program provides opportunities for Black and Latinx students aspiring to enter the STEM industry. It is committed to building a diverse tech workforce in the US and offers four years of mentorship to underrepresented students attending HBCUs to help them kickstart a career in STEM. CodeHouse, co-founded in 2019 by Morehouse alumni Ernest Holmes, Jaycee Holmes, and Tavis Thompson, focuses on tackling the diversity gap in the tech industry. Their initiative program provides mentorship

Entrepreneurs Daa’iyah Fogle, a Claflin University alumnus, and Malcolm Lee, a graduate of Virginia Union University, are the winners of the NBA Foundation’s first-ever pitch competition in partnership with Black Girl Ventures. The joint competition, held in Cleveland, allowed college-aged entrepreneurs from HBCUs across the US to participate and pitch their business ideas to a panel of judges. The entrepreneurs eligible to participate in the competition were all Black Girl Ventures’ NextGen Program members. The scheme was created to support the next generation of Black and brown business leaders attending

The Propel Center, the global HBCU technology and learning hub intended to level the playing field and open greater doors of opportunity for HBCU students, today announced the launch of its Propel Student Impact Scholarships, with support from Apple and Southern Company. The new scholarship program, directed at HBCU students who are interested in pursuing careers in entrepreneurship, arts & entertainment, agri-tech, social justice, and health, is open to rising sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduates students alike. Propel Center will donate a total of 100 $10,000 scholarship awards to the winners, an

Netflix co-CEO Reed Hastings and his wife, Patty Quillin, an independent film producer, are personally donating $10 million to Tougaloo College, a historically Black college and university in Mississippi, and the school’s partnership with Brown University. The gift will fund much-needed financial aid for Tougaloo students working toward careers in medicine, public health, the sciences, education, business, and other fields and aspiring to make a positive impact on their communities after graduation. Of the total, $5 million will fund scholarships at Tougaloo, in Jackson, Miss., and $5 million will establish the Brown-Tougaloo Partnership

Apple has just announced its supports for the Propel Center, A Global HBCU Leadership Hub, With $2M In Research Grants. Through the company’s Racial Equity and Justice Initiative, support from Apple will give HBCUs tools and resources to pursue new research and learning opportunities. Propel, and Apple are working together to help develop curricula and provide ongoing mentorship, learning experiences, and internship opportunities. Imagined in January 2021 by Ed Farm—an ed-tech nonprofit committed to transforming classrooms to uplift communities— and supported by founding partners Apple and Southern Company, the Propel Center

Administrators at historically Black colleges are patiently awaiting passage of President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda, with hopes that the bill’s record funding for HBCUs and their science and tech students on a path to further success. They believe the proposed funding level in the Build Back Better bill would make their school more competitive and improve job prospects for students. The package – if passed – would provide $3 billion for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or STEM, programs at minority-serving institutions. It comes at a time where dozens of companies

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