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Guetto Institute, a Rio de Janeiro-based non-profit organization is enabling access to cutting-edge technology and a brighter future for Black Brazilians while tackling systemic racism. It’s focused on equipping its target audiences with skills for the new economy and fostering black entrepreneurship. How did the organization begin? It started from a Facebook group created in 2016 by sociologist Vítor Del Rey. At the time, Del Rey was studying at the prestigious business school Fundação Getúlio Vargas with a scholarship provided by Educafro, an organization focused on education inclusion for black

To help bridge the gap between Black homeowners and their white counterparts, Ashley D. Bell and Dr. Bernice A. King have partnered up to launch a new initiative to make the path to homeownership more accessible.  Fintech platform, Ready Life offers consumers a new path to buying a home that does not include credit score requirements. Instead, the clever move aims to equip communities with the tools needed to help them advance economically.  Continuing her father’s legacy Dr. Bernice King, daughter of civil rights legend, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., is following in her father’s footsteps

Black women are 84% more likely to be abused on social media than white women, according to a 2018 Amnesty International study. By 2020, further research by Glitch, a UK charity committed to ending the abuse of women and marginalized people online, found that online abuse against women disproportionately impacts Black women, non-binary people, and women from minoritized communities, all of whom were more likely to feel like their complaints to social media companies were not adequately addressed. Black women in the public eye bear the brunt of online trolling. Seyi Akiwowo, the

Black Girls CODE board member Heather Hiles is breaking their silence regarding allegations made against them from Black Girls CODE founder Kimberly Bryant. Hiles’ comments are the latest in a still developing fight between Black Girls CODE’s board and the nonprofit’s recently ousted founder Kimberly Bryant. Earlier this month, Black Girls CODE announced that they have officially removed Bryant from the organization. The announcement follows Bryant’s own move to take ownership of the narrative. The Business Insider reports that Bryant has filed a suit in federal court against Black Girls CODE, alleging that she was

Kimberly Bryant, the co-founder and former CEO of Black Girls CODE, has spoken up after officially being removed from her leadership position.  Bryant founded Black Girls CODE in 2011 to introduce young girls of color to computer science and increase the number of women of color in the digital technology space. Today, the nonprofit is a household name with chapters across the US and other countries. However, Bryant reported waking up last December to discover that she could no longer access her work email. She soon received a letter informing

Last month, Kenya’s ICT Minister announced that it had no plans to ban Facebook or shut down the Internet despite reports emerging that the platform is failing to combat hate speech that could lead to election violence.  The statement came after Global Witness, an advocacy group, and Foxglove, a non-profit legal firm, released a report stating that Facebook “appallingly failed to detect hate speech ads in the two official languages of the country: Swahili and English.” Although Facebook released a blog post on July 20th that detailed its plans to combat

They’ve been spat on, called racist names, harassed in grocery stores, and violently attacked. Since the emergence of COVID-19, some combination of misinformation, disinformation, and conspiracy theory has been weaponized to target people perceived to be Chinese. The violent consequences of online disinformation targeting Asian American and Pacific Islander communities demonstrate the power of the internet to stoke racial resentment. Misinformation, disinformation, and online hate speech have led to widespread violence in India, Myanmar, and Sri Lanka in the past several years.  Conspiracy theories targeting the AAPI community have caused upswells in hate crimes

Flutterwave, a Nigerian tech giant under immense heat due to several allegations by former staff, will cease its offering of virtual dollar card services. It comes a week after a Kenyan court froze more than $40 million in accounts belonging to fintech firm Flutterwave under the country’s anti-money laundering laws. And while the latest announcement may be unrelated to the freezing of assets – the startup is struggling to stay out of the headlines as of late. Other fintech startups, including crypto exchange Busha, Rwanda-headquartered Payday, and Ugandan Eversend also

Does Y Combinator invest in Black-owned companies? A question asked back in 2011 by online user prime0196. A time when diversity in tech was awful. It was also the year CNN published a long piece on how Silicon Valley was fighting to keep its diversity data secret. CNNMoney had filed a Freedom of Information request in August seeking EEO-1 data from 20 companies: The tech industry’s 10 biggest firms by annual sales and 10 smaller but influential firms, including Facebook and Twitter. The EEOC denied the request in full, saying

Carbon transformation company Twelve has raised $130 million in Series B funding to further support the engineering and manufacturing industries. The funding round was led by DCVC and included Series A investors Capricorn Technology Impact Fund and Carbon Direct Capital Management. Breakout Ventures, Munich Re Ventures, Elementum Ventures, Microsoft Climate Innovation Fund, and other investors participated in the funding round.  The new funding will deploy the world’s first carbon transformation product. The product, designed to create a wide range of products with a lower carbon footprint, will use transformative technology

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