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Latinx

This article by Josefina Mancilla was originally published on Medium. First time for everything… like being an American Growing up, the only people I knew (knew knew) were immigrants, Latin American immigrants. People who barely spoke English, worked long hours doing tiring work — cleaning ladies, construction workers, nannies, janitors, mechanics, truckers, field workers, etc. The kind of people who got paid by the hour, sometimes minimum wage, sometimes no health benefits or paid sick leave or PTO. Good people who worked hard but got back very little. I never knew

Women of color are skilled, ambitious, and talented yet they continue to be underrepresented in senior positions in the workplace. In a recent study involving more than 300 companies and 40,000 employees, LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company have shed light on some of the experiences of women in the ‘post’-pandemic workplace. Here’s what we learned about the experiences of women of color in the workplace; the challenges they face and how they are taking their careers into their own hands. The Pipeline Problem  Women of color are still hugely underrepresented in

Florida International University (FIU) has launched a new initiative to give students the necessary skills and credentials to excel in high-demand tech careers.  The gap between the Latinx community and the tech industry  The university has more than 32,000 students who identify as Hispanic or Latinx enrolled in their courses. However, despite the Hispanic community making up one-fifth of the U.S. workforce, only a tiny percentage of them find their way into the tech workforce.  According to reports, the absence of Latinx people within the tech industry stems back to the

A Latino Corporate Directors Association (LCDA) report has revealed a lack of Latinx representation on giant company boards.  Lack of representation on company boards According to the LCDA, Latino directors are missing from 47% of Fortune 100, 59% of Fortune 500, and 65% of Fortune 1000 boards. This means companies seriously lack Latino/Hispanic representatives on a higher level.  Despite Latinx people making up the second largest US population, with a total of 62.1 million, there has been no change in Fortune 100 companies adopting more diverse practices by having Hispanic/Latino representation on their

Are Black and Latinx neighborhoods more prone to experiencing slower internet services?  According to a recent study by The Markup, the households that suffered from slower internet service were based in prominently lower-income areas with fewer white residents. Despite the service being a lot slower than the other household, both are paying the exact same price for their internet services – meaning the slower internet speed doesn’t come at a cheaper price.  Racial Digital Divide In the study, The Markup gathered and analysed more than 800,000 internet services from AT&T,

J Balvin, also known as the Prince of Reggaeton, has made a wholesome move to create an open discussion around mental health struggles by launching OYE, a bilingual wellness app.  The app, currently available for download on the app store, was built by Latin creators in Spanish and English. It provides users with emotional check-ins and goal-setting exercises and promotes the idea of achieving a balance between emotional wellness, physical health, and interpersonal relationships.  “After the pandemic, global youth – really everyone – is extremely burnt-out. Anxiety, depression, and feelings of being

Brazil-based startup, Gen-t, is an organization at the forefront of medical evolution.  The startup, founded by Lygia da Veiga Pereira in 2021, is a company built on advancing science and medical technology.  Gen-t’s mission is to diversify global genomic data to help fasten medical breakthroughs and make novel discoveries based on different phenotypes. Despite being new, the organization has managed to raise $2 million in a pre-seed funding round led by Eduardo Mufarej.  “The field keeps saying that we need diversity, but most of the diversity in the world is in countries with

Guetto Institute, a Rio de Janeiro-based non-profit organization is enabling access to cutting-edge technology and a brighter future for Black Brazilians while tackling systemic racism. It’s focused on equipping its target audiences with skills for the new economy and fostering black entrepreneurship. How did the organization begin? It started from a Facebook group created in 2016 by sociologist Vítor Del Rey. At the time, Del Rey was studying at the prestigious business school Fundação Getúlio Vargas with a scholarship provided by Educafro, an organization focused on education inclusion for black

Since its launch in 2009, WhatsApp has intensified instant messaging and made communicating easier for families, friends, and companies. But in most recent years, particularly during the pandemic, it’s being used for much more. Teachers in Africa took advantage of the platform during the lockdowns when schools were shut. Data from a study conducted by Sabinet analyzed a WhatsApp group of 24 economics teachers and three lead teachers (heads of departments) from 15 schools in Kwazulu-Natal province, South Africa and a focus group interview was thematically analyzed to present findings.

Angeles Investors have announced the winners of this year’s Estrellas award. The line-up features a collection of the top 40 funders and venture capital firms investing in Hispanic and Latinx startups.  This year’s cohort exemplifies leadership in investing in top startups and Hispanic and Latinx founders, among the fastest-growing segments of the U.S. economy.    “It’s exciting to see the number of top funders and venture capital groups investing in Latino startups grow,” said Adele Cepeda, Angeles Investors Board Chair and Director at BMO Financial Corporation.  “In 2020, we started

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