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It has been a rough couple weeks since the City of Los Angeles was rocked by the death of Nipsey Hussle. It hit me hard and I haven’t stopped thinking or talking about Nip since that Sunday. Since his passing, most media coverages eulogized him as an entertainer who just came off a Grammy nomination for Best Rap Album. It’s a meaningful milestone, but that description misses his most important contributions to the city. His music combined stories from the streets with thoughtful insights about personal and community wealth. But

As a native New Yorker, I’ve found the last four years in the San Francisco Bay Area to have been quite interesting. I’ve had the opportunity to learn about different cultures, try new food, and meet some amazing people. However, in some cases, my experiences have been worse than at home. I’ve also been called the N-word on the street. My partner and I have been called “pansies” on our way to dinner. And, because of my AfroLatinx features, I often have to explain to other Latinxs why I speak

AI ethics: Diverse teams are a great start but we need a wider cultural change in tech AI ethics is a hot topic in the tech industry. As a result of work by pioneering researchers like Joy Buolamwini we’re learning more about how algorithms can discriminate against underrepresented groups, most alarmingly ethnic and gender minorities. While AI and machine learning hold great promise, many are concerned about the impact new technology will have on society. Giants of the tech industry like Google and Facebook, government and academia are all trying

Being the only black face in the room is difficult. Here’s why I sought out spaces where I felt at home. I’ve always been aware that I’m black. I’ve also always been aware from a young age, that being black meant I was different, and incidents told me this wasn’t a “good” thing. My parents never sat down and explained to me what being black and female meant, but as a child, I knew. I knew it when kids would make fun of my name in primary school. I knew

This article was originally posted here. Written by Jennifer Opal  It is the end of British Science Week where we celebrate all things STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths). As we celebrate incredible pioneers in science, I thought, “Why not share how you became a Junior Software Engineer?” (When I say you, I mean me! Haha!) Let’s start with my background… So what was I doing before I discovered coding? Well, I was previously working with a Young Offenders Team of a Council back in London & volunteering with young

Originally posted by Wogrammer, written and edited by Shruti Kumar Sundas Khalid had never considered attending college, let alone a profession in engineering. As a young woman coming from a conservative family in Faisalabad, Pakistan, she says receiving an education and building a career was unheard of. Shortly after finishing high school in Pakistan, Sundas got married and came to the United States in 2004 to live with her husband. After a six-year gap in her education, she decided to pick up where she left off and further her studies. Sundas

Originally posted by Women of Silicon Valley, written by Raquel Small Isabel Céspedes Artist, Event Producer, Creative Director for Sista Circle: Black Women in Tech | she/her Isabel “Isa” Céspedes is an Artist, Event Producer, Diversity and Inclusion Creative Strategist, and the Creative Director for Sista Circle: Black Women in Tech. Her interactive experiences provide safe spaces for Black women to come together as tech professionals to exchange ideas and support community professional growth. Originally from Oakland, Isa brings the rich tradition of Black art and socio-political dialogue to her

Flatiron Health is hiring on pocitjobs.com In 2001, as a 17-year old kid in Nigeria, Ina Onoche decided to learn to code. His interest was piqued when his friends told him that only “geniuses” like Bill Gates could become Software Engineers. Challenge accepted. “I didn’t think it was that hard,” Ina says, learning solely through books and in spite of Nigeria [like most countries at the time] only having limited dial-up access. “After I started playing around with computers, they became so interesting to me.” In this interview, Ina talks

Kamilah Taylor is a senior software engineer, writer, and public speaker. She has worked in iOS and robotics at LinkedIn, Wolfram Research, and at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Kamilah is currently working on an app that aims to foster thoughtful conversation online while reducing polarization and toxicity. Originally posted here on Medium via Women of Silicon Valley – edited Clarissa Bukhan When did you know that you wanted to work in tech? I first started to consider a career in tech during high school, when I took a robotics class. I remember loving that I

Three days ago 157 people lost their lives in my worst nightmare. Just six minutes after takeoff, Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 heading for Nairobi, crashed near Bishoftu, Ethiopia after a struggle by the pilots to gain control of the aircraft. Initial reports predictably focused on the safety record of the airline (we see you Financial Times) and the number of Western lives affected or lost (a fail). However, just 48 hours later outlets like The Points Guy, The Atlantic, and NewsOne quickly called BS on the hierarchical value of lives evident in early reports

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