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Edgardo Perez

As a technical recruiter, I love understanding the composition of a team, learning what skills are missing, and recruiting people who will round things out and help the team perform optimally. But most of all, I love being able to work for a company where I can cast a wide net to untapped communities that include underrepresented people because we truly value inclusion. As a woman and the daughter of Peruvian immigrants, I sit at the intersection of two groups who struggle to get into the recruiting pipeline. I know

This interview featuring LaShaun Williams was originally posted here via Abstract. What personal passions bring you to Abstract? I really love solving problems with design and technology, and that’s exactly what I get to do at Abstract. I’m also passionate about equal opportunity for underrepresented communities, and Abstract’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, willingness to have uncomfortable conversations and actually walk that talk is a refreshing rarity. What’s one childhood lesson that you still carry with you to this day? When you’re most uncomfortable, when you feel most challenged —

Tell us about your personal passions! I’m incredibly passionate about increasing diversity in tech and making sure minorities are equipped with the proper skills to excel in the space. Over the last ten years, I’ve only had the privilege of working with a handful of minorities. Diversity and inclusivity in tech is a problem, and we can no longer blame it on the hiring pipeline. We have to be intentional and create a space that works for everyone. What’s one childhood lesson that you still carry with you to this

As a native New Yorker, I’ve found the last four years in the San Francisco Bay Area to have been quite interesting. I’ve had the opportunity to learn about different cultures, try new food, and meet some amazing people. However, in some cases, my experiences have been worse than at home. I’ve also been called the N-word on the street. My partner and I have been called “pansies” on our way to dinner. And, because of my AfroLatinx features, I often have to explain to other Latinxs why I speak