Posts in Category

Mental Health

Postpartum difficulties and a gap in the wellness industry led LaDonna Welch to create a mental health app, Ebony Notes, designed to affirm the Black community. Meet LaDonna Welch Welch advocates for diversity, equity, representation, personal growth, and inclusion. After giving birth to her second child in 2012, she learned she had postpartum and seasonal depression when she went to a doctor to discuss her symptoms. “They suggested that I speak to someone, and I was in my 30s. At this point, I had never even considered talking to anyone,”

A new study by Emagine Solutions Technology suggests that pregnancy apps lack key features to serve modern maternal health needs. Emagine Solutions Technology provides a new level of care for pregnant women by combining handheld ultrasound and remote patient monitoring software to improve maternal health outcomes. The platform was developed by Courtney Williams, who in 2021 won a second prize award for Pharrell Williams’ Black Ambition Initiative.  The investment firm Black Ambition, founded by Pharrell in 2020, is dedicated to supporting Black and Latinx business owners. Williams told AfroTech about her complications following childbirth during the

Developer and entrepreneur Ida Byrd-Hill is the visionary behind the Life Culture Audit vision board app, helping the Black community set and achieve their career and finance goals. The power of visualization Ida Byrd-Hill knows firsthand how visualization can change your life. In 2017, she founded the cybersecurity and tech re-skilling firm Automation Workz 4 U, later named Automation Workz Institute. When investors refused to invest in her firm, Byrd-Hill decided to sell her Detroit residence, car, and retirement funds and enter voluntary poverty. Four years later, Byrd-Hill has managed to

A Black birthing review app, Irth, is making its way into hospitals to improve Black families’ experiences. The Irth App Irth is a mobile app that collects and shares healthcare reviews from parents of color. The name comes from the word birth, with the ‘b’ dropped for bias. The app helps Black and brown women and birthing people have a safer and more empowered pregnancy experience by allowing users to see how other parents of color experience care from a doctor or at a hospital. The app enables Black birthing

Black women have long contributed to British history, culture, and life, but, like their American sisters, they do so in the face of racism and sexism. Black women’s experiences of microaggressions and discrimination mean they are more likely to experience mental health disorders than white women. They also have negative experiences of mental health care. Their treatment often involves law enforcement for Black women, with fewer opportunities for talking therapies. Black women are also over four times more likely to be involuntarily detained compared to other racial groups in Britain.

Black founder Katara McCarty launched her app, EXHALE, in 2020 after struggling to find an app suited to Black women’s wellbeing. Exhale App EXHALE is the first emotional well-being app designed for Black, Indigenous, and Women of Color (BIWOC). EXHALE was born from the idea that the Black and Brown community is holding its breath, waiting for the next video of police brutality, the next micro-aggression, or the following adverse health impact statistic. “It’s time to exhale – to breathe out all that isn’t serving BIWOC and breathe in healing, energy and

The Aster app was created to help women keep track of their pregnancy, communicate with a care team on the app and book appointments and remote monitoring. Founder of Aster FiFi Kara created the app after witnessing her family’s distress as her nephew was brought into the world. “After an emergency CAT 1 C-Section delivery, he required over seven minutes of resuscitation before he took his very first breath,” she wrote on LinkedIn. “The fact that both my nephew and sister are now thriving feels like a miracle, yet this narrative is sadly

EXHALE, a well-being app for Black women and women of color, shared its findings from a report that almost 2 in 5 (36%) Black women have left their jobs because they felt unsafe. The State of Self-Care for Black Women report EXHALE recently published its “The State of Self-Care for Black Women” report based on its survey of 1,005 Black women in the U.S. The report states that while diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives are expected in institutions today, fostering safe spaces for Black women requires more specific resources to focus on their

Libbie Health, an AI-powered app that gives women of color tools to reduce anxiety, was announced the winner of this year’s Make It in Brooklyn pitch contest. Libbie Health The app was founded by behavioral health coach Colette Ellis in 2022 to address racial and cultural disparities in mental health care. It also aims to create positive health outcomes for women, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ and marginalized leaders. Ellis was trained in Emotional-Freedom Technique (EFT) tapping in 2013 and began building it into her client work. “If you’ve ever been in a situation where you smelled

Young LGBTQ people of color feel safest and most understood on TikTok compared to other online spaces, according to research by The Trevor Project. For LGBTQ young people of color, experiencing a sense of safety and understanding in at least one online space has been linked to improved mental health. The Context According to the research, young LGBTQ people spend an average of five hours per day online, working out for approximately 45 minutes more than non-LGBTQ people. However, it has been found that although online spaces can cause harm

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