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Fundraising

Now, more than ever, mental health is making national headlines. Yet when it comes to treatment for mental illness, Black people are at a severe disadvantage. This past year alone, the pandemic, Black Lives Matter and fighting a system of oppression and racism has taken a significant toll on our mental health. However, due to the stigma in the community of seeking help, we aren’t supported in our struggles. When we seek help, it isn’t easy to find providers who understand us, trust us, and relate to our experience. There are

As a Latina founder of a social impact company, raising VC money hasn’t exactly been easy. Especially in Chicago, where I’m based, the VC community, while close-knit and easily accessible, is small, homogenous, and focused on later-stage investments. On the startup side, of the 65 Chicago-based startups backed by Chicago-based venture capital funds, only 16 (about 25%) have a non-white founder, and only 15 (or 23%) have a female founder to Chicago Blend. From firsthand experience, the lack of access to early-stage capital compared to the coasts has an oversized impact on underrepresented

The number of Latinx founders in the US is continuing to growing at a faster rate than any other demographic. Yet we’re all familiar with the drab stats: only 2.4% of total VC funding goes to Black and Latinx founders.  We’ve put together a list of some Latinx women founders who have broken through the ceiling: launching thriving and innovative companies developing new technology in software, medical, e-commerce and beyond.  Read how they’ve backed their ideas, raised funds and are changing the lives of many.  Ariel Lopez, Founder Knac The

Techish is back with a brand new episode! Abadesi and Michael discuss how white celebs are getting rich off a new cannabis narrative, yet POC still are still paying the price. (21:25) They also break down: The end of Indie.VC but their legacy carries on (00:10) Brandwatch’s impressive $450M exit! (11:10) Paying for Twitter? Twitter’s new super follow option (16:30) This Episode Is Sponsored By Notion Get your Notion account here. Notion is hiring! Check out their open positions  Extras Techish on PatreonAdvertise with TechishPlease rate and review the Techish podcast Subscribe To The Techish Podcast On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, And Other Platforms.

Techish · Techish is back with a brand new episode! Abadesi and Michael discuss how Rihanna (and co.) built Savage X Fenty by disrupting the beauty industry with diverse, inclusive, sex-positive campaigns, and a strategic partnership with Amazon.  (00:15) They also break down: LVMH shuts down Rihanna’s Fashion House Bitcoin hits 50K! (6:15) Tim Cook vs Mark Zuckerberg (12:20) Daniel Kaluuya sparks convo about power, race, and language in the media (20:31) This Episode Is Sponsored By Aha! They are hiring! Sr. Ruby on Rails Engineer! Apply here Sr. Product Marketing Manager! Apply here

Nigeria often dubbed, ‘Africa’s Silicon Valley’ is making a name for itself. Meet the talented Nigerians on the continent and the diaspora leading tech companies, building multi-million [and even billion] dollar business, investing in their community, and taking their talents globally. Tope Awotona | Founder, Calendly Awotona spent his early years as the second youngest in seven in a lower class neighborhood of Lagos, Nigeria. Yet, Awotona is the mastermind and founder behind a rarity – a Black-owned unicorn, the scheduling powerhouse, ‘Calendly.’ In an interview with Fortune, Tope talks

What we know for so far Colin Kaepernick intends to raise $250 million through a SPAC, a blank-check company. Named ‘Mission Advancement’ it will target a $1billion US company that has a social mission. The SPAC board is made up entirely of Black, Indigenous and people of color and majority women. Colin Kaepernick, the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback who took a knee during the national anthem to protest systemic racism and police brutality —is now searching for a $1 billion company with a social purpose. Kaepernick known for his

Kicking off Black History Month in the US Backstage Capital has announced they’re opening their fund to allow regular people to invest alongside Backstage Capital. Through the crowdsourcing platform, Republic, individuals will have easier access to become venture capitalists. Opening the doors of opportunity for regular people to invest like a VC. It’s already raised $1M from over 2000 investors, with amounts as a little as $100. Leading the way with a new approach to venture capital investing, accredited and non-accredited investors can invest alongside Backstage giving talented underrepresented founders access to capital.

The number of Black-owned businesses has risen dramatically. Research shows, since 2007, the number of firms owned by African-American women has grown by 164%. Yet despite the knowledge, innovation, and let’s face it – the hustle, minority entrepreneurs, are being shut out when it comes to access to capital. However, many Black and Brown celebrities are growing their investment portfolios and flexing their VC muscle. Not only are they investing in startups and hooking up founders with serious capital, but they are also using their platform and wealth to empower

The “Pipeline” is Blocked At The Top — With the recent uprising against systemic racism in our governmental institutions and society, there has been an increased focus on the on the lack of funding for underrepresented founders. Only 1% of VC funded startup founders are Black, Latinas have received .04% of VC funding, women of color can expect an average of $42k seed funding vs. the average seed funding of $1m, the list of stats goes on. Yet the problem is far deeper than startup founder-level stats. It exists at the other side of

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