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Entrepreneurship

Originally published by Wogrammer here. Ananya Cleetus has a day named after her in the city of Pittsburgh. She is the creator of an app called Anemone, a TEDx speaker, and a computer science student at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She exudes a unique type of confidence while speaking intelligently and thoughtfully about the journey that led her here today.  While Ananya has accomplished so much early in her career, her success hasn’t come without its share of personal adversity. Earlier in her collegiate career, while studying Computer Science

Originally published here on Medium Last month, my company Hustle Crew celebrated its third birthday. It’s a significant milestone for many reasons. Three years is the same amount of time I spent at university completing my bachelor’s degree. The longest period I’ve ever worked at a single company (Groupon, 2011–2014). Most importantly it’s far longer than many experts I met at the start — from other CEOs to investors — thought this business would last. I’ll spare you our origin story as I’ve shared it before, but in 2016 when I set

Kerry Schrader is woman, Black, and a Baby Boomer. She overcame the odds to make her tech company, Mixtroz, big news. Kerry Schrader was the 37th Black woman to raise $1 million for a startup. Her daughter and business partner in their company, Mixtroz, Ashlee Ammons, was number 38. Schrader is proud of her achievement but admits, “Each time I say it, I become more disenchanted with it.” Why? She has a hunch that if she and her daughter could have presented Mixtroz anonymously, it would be valued at a quarter

As we near the end of Black History Month in the UK, our hope is that black British history surpasses a months celebration to become an integral part of British history. There are dozens, if not hundreds of unsung black heroes across British history from Alice Kinloch, the South African activist who came to Britain and founded the African Association who created the first Pan-African conference in London in 1900. To others such as modern-day educator, rapper, entrepreneur and activist, Akala. The renowned author of The Sunday Times Best Seller

This post was originally published here on Sept 22, 2019, on Medium. Arlan Hamilton — founder and managing partner at Backstage Capital — summarized best why investing in Black Female Founders (BFF) isn’t just important, but could produce high yields: “Less than 0.2 percent of all early-stage venture funding goes to Black women, while we make up approximately 8 per cent of the U.S. population and are one of the fastest-growing entrepreneur segments in the country,” Arlan wrote. “It is my firm belief that because Black women have had to make do

This article captures the pain-staking yet exhilarating fundraising journey of the TRIM-IT App founders Darren Tenkorang, Nathan Maalo, Nana Darko and Peter Lloyd. TRIM-IT is a mobile barbershop service that via an app offers a subscription service for men to get their hair cut [sans the hassle of traveling or long queues]. On the brink of shutting down their companyy, the universe threw a life jacket of $250,000! Based on this viral twitter thread, CEO Darren shows us that resilience is key when it comes to fundraising! For those that

“Every American should have a fair shot at starting a small business. The only things that should determine whether a new business succeeds are the strength of the idea and the hard work of the owners and employees.” – Elizabeth Warren She’s right. And the 7 billion dollar grant Senator Warren is proposing would certainly go a long way to make this happen — maybe. I was recently interviewed by Forbes for my thoughts around what the grant would mean to minority entrepreneurs, and my response may not have been

“The beauty about community is that you often start off creating content, curating content then co-ordinating content created by the community” Andy Ayim Five entrepreneurs. One mission; building a business with ‘community’ in the center. If there is one lesson that can be taken away from the stories of these five founders, it is that a community first approach can be the key to success for a ‘start-up’. Black people [and people of color in general] know what it is like to not have their narrative told in the mainstream,

I am often asked during interviews to share my experience as a Black business owner in the Startup world. You know, how I got started, how I’ve gotten this far. My go-to response is to explain that I have had many positive experiences, some negative, and I consider myself to be a business owner who happens to be Black — rather than a Black business owner.Yet, I have had to admit to myself that I am somewhat offended by the question. And perhaps more offensive than the question being asked

Every year around 0.2% of business funding goes to Black women so last year when Joycelyn and I set out to raise £360k ($450k) whilst I had a very visible baby bump, we knew we’d have a serious fight on our hands… At this years London Tech Week, I was flicking through my notes and saw that a year ago we didn’t know the difference between VC and angel investment. Under a year after attending events to learn about investment, in an environment where young black women aren’t funded, we

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